The Wall Park

Wall Park © 2007 Franz Richter Eigenes Werk

1 / 23

Site plan as of 1994 © 1994 Prof. Gustaf Lange/GrünBerlin GrünBerlin GMbH

2 / 23

Birch grove, view to the south © 1995 Almut Jirku almut Jirku

3 / 23

View from the embankment at the amphitheatre © 1995 Almut Jirku

4 / 23

Amphitheatre shortly after completion © 1995 Almut Jirku

5 / 23

Large meadow, view to the south © 2008 Almut Jirku

6 / 23

Scilla in the birch grove © 1996 Almut Jirku

7 / 23

View of the embankment © 2011 Almut Jirku

8 / 23

Sundays on the big meadow © 2011 Almut Jirku

9 / 23

top-of-bank wall © 1995 Almut Jirku

10 / 23

Ascent to the slope © 2000 Almut Jirku

11 / 23

Park entrance from the south Tree-lined steps lead from Eberswalder Strasse into Mauerpark© 1995 Almut Jirku

12 / 23

Mauerpark in spring Flowering bushes as background for fashion photography© 2002 Almut Jirku

13 / 23

Aerial view Mauerpark and surroundings © Senatsverwaltung für Stadtentwicklung, Abt. III

14 / 23

View to the west The overuse of the lawn becomes clear© 2000 Almut Jirku AJ

15 / 23

Wall Park Ash trees in the square area on Schwedter Straße© 1995 Almut Jirku AJ

16 / 23

Wall Park Birch grove in the north© 2010 Almut Jirku AJ

17 / 23

Mauerpark, rediscovered Schwedter Strasse The road traces the course of the first front land wall.© 1995 Almut Jirku AJ

18 / 23

Berlin Wall © 2011 Stadtpoetin Eigenes Werk

19 / 23

Wall Park © 2005 Georg Feitscher Eigenes Werk

20 / 23

Mauerpark in winter in the background the television tower© 2010 Caps 11 Eigenes Werk

21 / 23

In the foreground the Bornholmer Straße S-Bahn station, behind it the Jahn sports field and Mauerpark © 2012 Spree Tom Eigenes Werk

22 / 23

Karaoke in Mauerpark © 2010 Niels Elgaard Larsen Eigenes Werk

23 / 23

Wall Park © 2007 Franz Richter Eigenes Werk

Site plan as of 1994 © 1994 Prof. Gustaf Lange/GrünBerlin GrünBerlin GMbH

Birch grove, view to the south © 1995 Almut Jirku almut Jirku

View from the embankment at the amphitheatre © 1995 Almut Jirku

Amphitheatre shortly after completion © 1995 Almut Jirku

Large meadow, view to the south © 2008 Almut Jirku

Scilla in the birch grove © 1996 Almut Jirku

View of the embankment © 2011 Almut Jirku

Sundays on the big meadow © 2011 Almut Jirku

top-of-bank wall © 1995 Almut Jirku

Ascent to the slope © 2000 Almut Jirku

Park entrance from the south Tree-lined steps lead from Eberswalder Strasse into Mauerpark© 1995 Almut Jirku

Mauerpark in spring Flowering bushes as background for fashion photography© 2002 Almut Jirku

Aerial view Mauerpark and surroundings © Senatsverwaltung für Stadtentwicklung, Abt. III

View to the west The overuse of the lawn becomes clear© 2000 Almut Jirku AJ

Wall Park Ash trees in the square area on Schwedter Straße© 1995 Almut Jirku AJ

Wall Park Birch grove in the north© 2010 Almut Jirku AJ

Mauerpark, rediscovered Schwedter Strasse The road traces the course of the first front land wall.© 1995 Almut Jirku AJ

Berlin Wall © 2011 Stadtpoetin Eigenes Werk

Wall Park © 2005 Georg Feitscher Eigenes Werk

Mauerpark in winter in the background the television tower© 2010 Caps 11 Eigenes Werk

In the foreground the Bornholmer Straße S-Bahn station, behind it the Jahn sports field and Mauerpark © 2012 Spree Tom Eigenes Werk

Karaoke in Mauerpark © 2010 Niels Elgaard Larsen Eigenes Werk

The Mauerpark between the former districts of Wedding and Prenzlauer Berg was the first park planned after the fall of the Wall. Based on a design by Gustav Lange, the first half, in the former eastern part of the city, was completed in 1994. In the following years it was extended to the north. The western half is still awaiting completion today (8/2012).

The area is immediately adjacent to the Friedrich Ludwig Jahn Sports Park and Falkplatz. Mauerpark links east and west and enhances the recreational amenities for the high-density inner city neighborhoods. Key elements are the large meadow on the plain, a clearing in the city, and the embankment towards the stadium, which opens up an excellent view to the west. The course of the Vorderland wall, which ran here in two places in succession due to an exchange of territory, is marked by paths. The first, eastern course of the wall is highlighted by the recovered Schwedter Straße. The later, western course of the wall currently forms the boundary of the realized park section in the west. In the northern extension there is a children's farm and play facilities.

Characteristic of the concept is the retention of the emptiness that characterized this space both as a railway site and as a border strip. It is reinterpreted as a clearing in the city. The large central lawn, which allows the experience of space in the midst of dense development, is held on the east side by the slope that forms the back of the Jahn sports stadium. The former boundary lines, which ran here in two places, are traced by paths.

The rediscovered Schwedter Strasse forms the baseline at the foot of the slope. Parallel to it, the middle path, later to be accompanied by trees and statues, will lead north. It marks the boundary line after the area swap in 1988 and currently completes the first construction phase. Between these two lines, a flight of steps, followed by a grove, forms the prelude to the Mauerpark. The Hinterland Wall, covered in graffiti, remains as the border between the stadium and the park, as does the asphalt path. Here it is permitted to continue painting the wall. (There was hope that this would spare other park elements from graffiti. However, this has not materialized). Granite blocks provide seating, and large swings swing far into the space. The hillside itself, for which Tuscany served as a model, was to be transformed into a sea of blossoms in spring and early summer. However, due to intensive use, only the more robust plants were able to survive. The heavy use of the amphitheater leads again and again to erosion phenomena in this area.

If one approaches the park from the south, tree-covered steps form the entrance area. East of Schwedter Street, a zigzag path leads up the embankment. Continuing west along Schwedter Strasse, granite-framed rectangular areas push into the lawn. Cut cubes of evergreen conifers are interspersed. Then visitors encounter a collection of rough-hewn granite stones, loosely overhung by ash trees. Opposite, an amphitheatre blends into the hillside. To the west, again, a basketball court adjoins. Originally, a water table was to be built here, but this could not be financed. The northern end is formed by a square of cut conifers, in which deciduous trees stand.

On the gravel surface above a tunnel, birch trees form a sparse grove, with ivy and hornbeams accompanying the retaining wall. Numerous blue scilla under the birches provide a charming picture in spring. This area was initially separated by a fence and a dog barrier. But the dog ban was permanently disregarded, which is why the fence was removed. The playground, which is placed at the northern end of the meadow, was originally supposed to be placed under trees in the western part. But this was too long in coming. The pole nearby is a student project. Both elements are contrary to the concept of a free open clearing and are to be relocated with the expansion of the park.

The north area is accessed at Gleim Street by a flight of steps and via an entrance area at the children's farm with granite steps and ramp. These bound an intensive use play area (asphalt surface) with a streetball facility and tree plantings. Further to the north is another play area with a climbing rock. The main path axis is interrupted by a sunken garden. Pastures, meadows and planting areas, some of which can be used by the existing children's farm, characterize the public park area.

The Mauerpark was the first park in the style of the second modernism, which was realized in Berlin. It was and is very well received, has become a real tourist attraction. Its substance is considerably attacked and there are serious problems with garbage and dog waste, especially on or after weekends due to the neighboring flea market and regular Sunday karaoke events. The currently very intensive use overtaxes any lawn area. This is another reason why the extension is urgently needed.

Read more +

Information on external websitesn

GrünBerlin GmbH, Der Mauerpark

Senatsverwaltung für Stadtentwicklung und Umwelt, Mauerpark

Planning offices

Gustav Lange
Prof. Gustav Lange, Hamburg, Ankerland
Planung Nordpark:
Thomas Guba für GrünBerlin GmbH und Michael Breuckmann Gartenarchitektur

Project period
1991 - 1994 1. Ba

Size
1. Bauabschnitt: ca. 4-5 ha

Client
Land Berlin, vertreten durch die Senatsverwaltung für Stadtentwicklung und Umweltschutz

GrünBerlin GmbH
Gefördert durch: Allianz Umweltstiftung

Address
Eberswalder Straße (Süden), Gleimstraße (Norden)
10437 Berlin
Deutschland

Show project location on map