Waldorf School in Prenzlauer Berg

The open space becomes a community place for all ages © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

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© Paul Giencke

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Unsealed and green - a climate-adapted and school-friendly open space. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

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The unsealed break yard as a multifunctional movement area, rest and exchange at the edge. Seating elements were developed and built together with the pupils. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

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Workshop with seating steps - sculptor and actor. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

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Rough next to smooth. A planted infiltration trough encloses a work island made of in-situ concrete. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

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Old next to new. Green shoulder terraces expand the classrooms. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

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Flowering infiltration trough as visualization of rainwater. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

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Decentralized infiltration trough in an open space niche. The adapted shade planting brings greenery into the sunken area. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

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In addition to the infiltration troughs, the movement areas were also largely unsealed. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

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The northern schoolyard fits in as a green open space under the existing trees. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

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Stamped concrete walls adapted to the tree locations create sports and recreation areas. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

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The open space becomes a community place for all ages © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

© Paul Giencke

Unsealed and green - a climate-adapted and school-friendly open space. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

The unsealed break yard as a multifunctional movement area, rest and exchange at the edge. Seating elements were developed and built together with the pupils. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

Workshop with seating steps - sculptor and actor. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

Rough next to smooth. A planted infiltration trough encloses a work island made of in-situ concrete. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

Old next to new. Green shoulder terraces expand the classrooms. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

Flowering infiltration trough as visualization of rainwater. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

Decentralized infiltration trough in an open space niche. The adapted shade planting brings greenery into the sunken area. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

In addition to the infiltration troughs, the movement areas were also largely unsealed. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

The northern schoolyard fits in as a green open space under the existing trees. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

Stamped concrete walls adapted to the tree locations create sports and recreation areas. © 2020 Paul Giencke, GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur

In the course of the new construction of the day care centre and the renovation of the Waldorf School in Prenzlauer Berg - Berlin, the outdoor facilities were redesigned. A spacious schoolyard with retreat possibilities, new work and break terraces and different intensive play and sports areas form the common outdoor facilities.

The same formal language and a sustainable, natural choice of materials bind the outdoor facilities together. The visible handling of rainwater and on-site infiltration are part of the pedagogical concept.

Climate-adapted & sustainable design
A play with the contrasts between natural open space and urban functional areas runs through the design of all areas, through all scales and materials. Hard next to soft, rough next to smooth. In order to protect sensitive areas, adjacent spaces were designed to be all the more intensive and use-oriented. A sustainable and ecological approach to the design has emerged naturally from the overlapping of the ideas of a climate-adapted open space and Waldorf education. The sealed surface has been reduced to a minimum, rainwater becomes a playful and creative element, the meadow is allowed to grow and the wild hedge to prick. Evaporation areas bring coolness to the schoolyard.

Without exception, all the existing trees and shrubs have been retained to provide shade, and the planning has been fitted in. Experiencing and understanding nature as a pedagogical teaching goal were already taken into account in the planning phase. Systemic connections, the handling of rainwater as a natural resource, the change of the open space with the seasons and ageing processes are consciously elaborated and made visible. Rainwater is integrated into the planning as a design element. Decentralised infiltration troughs create a spatial smallness and a wide variety of atmospheres through their intensive planting. Large-leaved perennials, restrained ground covers and flower meadows alternate. Other infiltration troughs become a robust play space. The sustainable choice of plants, from old varieties of fruit trees to climate-resilient, autochthonous meadow seedlings and edible wild hedges, also correspond to the basic educational idea.

Multifunctional break area
The open space becomes a community place for all ages - during lessons, break times and also outside school hours. In addition to large, multifunctional areas, there are diverse, small-scale open spaces for outdoor lessons - for music, handicrafts, art and horticulture. The design and programme of the different areas were partly developed in student workshops and also practically implemented in the handicraft lessons. Thus, in a joint effort, brick borders and seat walls were created from demolition stones.

Green workshop
With the renovation of the old prefabricated building, the basement with the workshops, art and horticulture rooms received new exits to the schoolyard. The slope swings back softly and creates a generous work yard as a work space in front. Stamped concrete seat walls draw several levels into the slope that is being created and make it usable for sitting, playing or as a stage for performances in the courtyard area. The work yard itself is presented as a uniform gravel surface that can be infiltrated, the work areas are drawn in as four in-situ concrete lenses of different sizes. The infiltration troughs become green oases between the individual work areas.

Garden and sports area
The new ball field is pushed under the existing trees on the side of the building facing the street, and the ball fence fits in with its height development. Calisthenics and an area lowered to the basement with seating walls and a table tennis table complement the exercise facilities. A new wild hedge with edible fruits and as a habitat for urban animals semi-transparently separates the green school open space from the neighbourhood.

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Artikel in der bdla-Verbandszeitschrift "Landschaftsarchitekten" 3/2020

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Planning offices

GM013 Landschaftsarchitektur
Berlin

Employees
Lukas Butzer, Martin auf der Lake, Rubin Ries

Project period
2017 - 2021

Size
3.900 qm

Construction amount
560.000 €

Client
Förderverein Schulemachen e.V.

Address
Gürtelstraße 16
10409 Berlin
Deutschland

Show project location on map

Project type
Playgrounds, e.g. at childcare centers and schools